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Poster: Earl B. Powell Date: Sep 28, 2019 6:41pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: What if no Hunter?

Man, Tell, your point is incredibly interesting, even though I don't have the depth of actual "facts" or desire to make a case for Merle. "Okie's" release (1969) predated my political awareness and activism. But in college "Okie" was in regular rotation on the jukebox, usually in the vicinity of "Redneck Mother" (1973) being played for our listening enjoyment.

We viewed both as a sarcastic slam against the warhawks and proletariat, rather than taking "Okie" as some sort of populist anthem. They both appeared as cut from the same cloth, even though "Okie" appeared to be much more tongue-in-cheek. To us, Okie was a farce, even though we had no idea (and didn't care) what Merle's intent was. (Even Ray Benson seemed quizzical regarding Haggard's weed use and how it squared with the lyrics in the documentary. Kind of a WTF?)

So all these years later, I guess it still depends on your perspective. But since you own the gold lame' smoking jacket, I must defer to your wisdom, title, and power...

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Poster: William Tell Date: Sep 28, 2019 8:56pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: What if no Hunter?

Well, it's sooo long ago, perceptions have been molded and remolded. I am relatively certain he played a Nixon party as a result of that song? In 1973? But, truth is we were just as knee-jerk reactionary as the other side at the time, that's for sure.

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Poster: Earl B. Powell Date: Sep 29, 2019 8:43am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: What if no Hunter?

Mr. Prime Minister, Sir, I was merely suggesting that my crowd took the song as a farcical representation of patriotism at the time, without due regard for the politics of the author. In those day we considered anything that was created and endorsed by Nashville counter-intuitive to the counterculture we ascribed to. In short, we thought country music and the country music establishment sucked. "Okie" was our anti-anthem.

As evidenced in the documentary, we watched as Nixon took respite from Watergate to help celebrate the grand opening of the Grand Ol' Opry theme park - with the country music establishments endorsement. This wasn't very endearing to me or my tribe - at all. And yes, we were just as guilty of stereotyping entire swatches of people as dumbass uninformed hillbilly swine as they were of unwashed long haired hippie trash.

At some point, it all softened up, enough so that Nashville doesn't appear to be a monolithic kingdom of political and cultural creeds.

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Poster: William Tell Date: Sep 29, 2019 9:52am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: What if no Hunter?

Sorry, crossed our wires there--agree completely that over time, most did take it as you describe. And MH came to align himself w that perspective too. My only point was his comments in 69/70 suggest anything but satire. And, we may have been overly judgmental w no tolerance for a mea culpa.

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Poster: Earl B. Powell Date: Sep 29, 2019 11:36am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: What if no Hunter?

All is well within the kingdom.